An International Nonproliferation Regime for Information Weapons: Utopia or Reality?

Author: I.N. DYLEVSKY, S.A. KOMOV, S.V. KOROTKOV, A.N. PETRUNIN, V.O. ZAPIVAKHIN

Maj. Gen. I.N. DYLEVSKY, Candidate of Military Sciences

Col. S.A. KOMOV (Res.), Doctor of Military Sciences

Maj. Gen. S.V. KOROTKOV (Res.), Candidate of Military Sciences

Col. A.N. PETRUNIN, Candidate of Science (Polit.)

Col. V.O. ZAPIVAKHIN

Abstract. The authors offer their interpretation of the term "information weapon" and their own definition of an information weapon nonproliferation regime. By analogy with the establishment and maintenance of the WMD nonproliferation regime, they give their arguments for rules and principles to be followed in structuring and breaking down an information weapon non-proliferation regime into components, where reasonable. Finally, the authors address problems facing efforts to establish an information weapon nonproliferation regime today.

Keywords: international information security, information weapons, information weapon nonproliferation regime, information warfare, information weapons race, intrusion support software, network traffic systems and analysis capabilities.

On July 24, 2013, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed an Executive Order approving the Guidelines for the Russian Federation's State Policy in International Information Security for the Period up to 2020. The guidelines name, the first time in Russian history, the fostering of conditions for establishment of an international information weapon nonproliferation regime under international law an alternative way to lower the risk of information and communication technologies (ICT) being used to commit hostile acts and aggression.1

Countering information weapon proliferation, an abstract theoretical prob-

page 1

lem until very recently, has now been put on the list of priorities for the Russian Security Council to deal with. The attention the information weapons receive in this country demonstrates to the world at large the Russian leaders' concern over the possibility of information being brought to the open market as a potential weapon to commit acts of aggression and terrorism, and also criminal and other hostile actions in the global information environment.

Once this entirely new military and political problem has arisen, it must first be profoundly understood, its ...

This is an article from EVXpress, a service of East View Information Services that allows you to search across more than 12 million journals and news publications for fee and immediately download full text using your credit card.
Price: $45.00
Delivery: immediate download or e-mail attachment
This content appears in EVXpress under license from the publisher. Inquiries regarding the content should be directed to the publisher directly.