Strategic Defense Systems to Deter Armed Aggression

Author: O.Yu. AKSYONOV, Yu.N. TRETYAKOV, Ye.N. FILIN

Col. O.Yu. AKSYONOV (Res.), Doctor of Technical Sciences

Col. Yu.N. TRETYAKOV (Ret.), Doctor of Technical Sciences

Maj. Ye.N. FILIN (Res.), Candidate of Technical Sciences

Abstract. The authors give an overview of strategic (nuclear) deterrence and show the significance of the role strategic defense systems fulfill in nuclear deterrence. They also acknowledge an increase in demands made upon what the aerospace defense systems and weapons have to do in the current situation, and argue for the need to modernize existing Russian strategic deterrence.

Keywords: military security, strategic (nuclear) deterrence, spaceborne missile defense, aerospace defense, spaceborne missile defense systems and weapons, strategic defense systems.

A close look at the situation in the world today provides convincing proof that the rivalry among world and regional power centers for more elbow room in their spheres of influence, including access to Russia's geostrategic and economic potential, has taken up a sharper edge. New challenges and threats to Russia's national interests are arising across the world.1 The trend toward the U.S. asserting its economic and military dominance in the world having but a single pole of influence is gathering strength. The U.S. doing-it-alone strategy is throwing the world out of balance, provoking tensions, and triggering regional and local conflicts far away from and quite near Russian borders.

Unfortunately, the existing international security system (including mechanisms set up under international law) does not guarantee equal security to all countries. On its part, Russia puts military security it interprets as a sense of protection a country feels against military threats and possible aggression by other countries on top of the list of its priorities.2 In our time, military threats to the Russian Federation are held back by strategic deterrence that is exercised by its

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nuclear deterrent to make up for the shortfall of its general-purpose forces' combat power. To have its nuclear deterrence work, Russia needs systems capable of ...

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