• Military Thought
  • 2004-12-31MTH-No. 004
  • Size: 38.1 Kbytes .
  • Pages:1-13.
  • Words: 5833

FORCE DEVELOPMENT AND STATE INNOVATION POLICY IN RUSSIA

Author: V. I. TSYMBAL

Col. V. I. TSYMBAL (Ret.)

Doctor of Technical Sciences

Vitaly Ivanovich TSYMBAL was born in Odessa in 1935. In 1958, he graduated from Higher Military Aviation Engineering School in Kiev, Ukraine. Held engineering positions in Air Force units. Upon completing postgraduate study in 1965, did research for Defense Ministry's 30 Central Research Institute. Wound up service in 1990 as directorate chief with MOD's 46 Central Research Institute. Since 1998, laboratory head, Institute of Transitional Period Economics. Has more than 300 scientific publications to his credit.

Formulated by the RF President, modernization of the state military organization is a crucial task that logically goes in tandem with other problems, particularly the doubling of the GDP on the basis of development of high technology industries and improvements in living standards.

Politicians and economists at last realized the necessity for civilized countries to transit to a new stage in their political and economic development-postindustrial society and knowledge economy-which is due to replace both capitalism and socialism, a necessity V. I. Vernadsky1 had predicted way back in the first half of the last century. The new economy calls for new approaches not only in the civilian but also military sectors of state activities.

Where Russia is concerned, it seems high time we gave attention to the following circumstance. Despite a lot of talk about knowledge and double-purpose technologies, it is not grounded in the legal framework that is currently in effect in the Russian Federation. Indeed, though RF science was announced a single entity, the law on science divides it into civilian and military (defense) branches, and, accordingly, into two spheres of scientific activities; the work to introduce latest scientific advances likewise pursues two vectors on the same principle.

The state has retained the function of introducing state-of-the-art technologies only for defense and state security; also it is concerned with promotion and improvement of space exploration and the atomic power industry.

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